EASY TO BUILD WIFI 2.4GHZ YAGI ANTENNA PDF

Pliers or preferably a nibbler see photo below, available at radio shack a metric ruler with millimeters or a metric caliper. Step 2: Building Overview The building steps are simple: 1. Trim paper clips to size and glue them to the template. Connect the USB device to the antenna.

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Pliers or preferably a nibbler see photo below, available at radio shack a metric ruler with millimeters or a metric caliper. Step 2: Building Overview The building steps are simple: 1. Trim paper clips to size and glue them to the template.

Connect the USB device to the antenna. I carefully scaled the diagram and turned it into a template in order to make the building process easy.

Step 3: Printing the Yagi Diagram The most essential point in printing the template is getting the correct scale. In the attached zip file below, are three png picture files.

The antenna is longer than an Letter sized or A4 sized paper. So you have to print the template in two parts labeled part1 and part2 in the zip file. I have also included the full sized unsplit template if your printer can handle large enough paper. You will notice vertical bars crossing the horizontal line.

The horizontal line is the backbone of the antenna which will be build out of popsicle sticks. You will also notice numbers next to the elements. These numbers are in pairs. The first number is the length of the element in millimeters.

The second number, is the distance from the start of the diagram to the element, in millimeters. Measure the size and position of a couple of elements on each prints. If your measurements match the numbers on the diagrams, then your print is to scale and you may proceed. Accuracy need not to be tight for the antenna to perform well. Now superimpose both prints, until they match at around element 10 or 11, and tack them together with scotch tape or white glue.

This is fairly straight forward. Snip at the marking. Make sure that each element fits correctly the length of the bar on the diagram. Fix the elements in place with crazy glue. Leave element 2 for later. Step 5: Building the Backbone The backbone holds the shape of the antenna. I just cut pieces of popsicle sticks and fit them between the gaps of the elements. I used white glue to fix them in place. Start from element 15 backward. When you arrive to element 2 move on to the next step.

It is a broken loop and not a straight wire. A loop of wire resonates at a specific radio frequency depending on its dimensions.

The dimensions of the driven element in this antenna is set at 2. It just happens that its about the size of a common big paper clip. You need to clip the paperclip so that it loops around and meet in the center but the end not touching, leaving a gap see photo. Fix it in place with crazy glue and build the back bone around it. When all the elements and sticks are in place, reinforce the antenna with another layer of popsicle sticks.

Glue full lengthed popsicle sticks on top of the antenna. The antenna should become mechanically stiff. Then rip the paper template of the antenna. Step 7: Connect the Antenna to the Wifi Modem This is the most difficult part and depends on the electronic hardware you have. Those with external antennae, like mine, are easier to connect because you are just replacing the external whip antenna with the Yagi. Those with internal antenna may need to have their on-board strip antenna modified as illustrated in the pictures here.

You need to slightly experiment in this case. I have no explanations why that did not work, but other DIYers that have built Yagi antennae connected their antenna in this manner. In my case, I just connected a single thin strand of copper wire between the active element of the strip antenna and one end of the loop of the driven element.

Please read the annotations of the pictures for more details. Step 8: Performance The performance was pretty spectacular for this easy to build antenna. I was able to see the WiFi of a hotel that was 2 miles away from my home. The most difficult part was connecting the antenna to the USB modem.

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Easy to Build WIFI 2.4GHz Yagi Antenna

Pliers or preferably a nibbler see photo below, available at radio shack a metric ruler with millimeters or a metric caliper. The building steps are simple: 1. Trim paper clips to size and glue them to the template. Connect the USB device to the antenna. I carefully scaled the diagram and turned it into a template in order to make the building process easy. Step 3Printing the Yagi Diagram The most essential point in printing the template is getting the correct scale. In the attached zip file below, are three png picture files.

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Long Range Yagi Antenna 19 Element 2.4GHz

Unless your transmit power I already below the FCC limit. Nick sent in this great build for improving your WiFi connection. Learn how to make your own Yagi WiFi antenna. By Marc de Vinck Marc de Vinck. Assuming the antennae simply contain a pair of dipoles can anyone provide a link to a teardown of the typical dual-band antennae that come with consumer routers? Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Yoghurt instead of yogurt? Do we need to be careful not to be antisocial with this kind of modification?

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